Archive for the ‘International Marketing’ Category

12
Jul

Today I wanted to paraphrase a well-known business article (It is the Distribution, stupid!) to showcase the importance of managing Media properly when building the Personal Brand Identity. And for doing so we have two perfect examples that reflect what should be and should not be done.

lebron james

IKER CASILLAS AND HIS MISSTEP

Iker Casillas has managed its Personal Branding relatively well for many years. I am not sure how systematic and structured he was in his approach, but in the end of the day he came across to Spaniards as a brilliant goalkeeper, with a human touch (reflected when he gave a call to Xavi from Barcelona to end up a club discussion) and passion for what he did and achieved (just recall what happened with Sara Carbonero 4 years ago upon winning the Soccer Wordlcup).

iker casillas

Moreover, he has managed relatively well his presence in Social Media, where we can find him in Twitter, Facebook and even Instagram, and has actually got really good PR thanks to some of his prizes, such as the one granted by the UNPD:  Goodwill Ambassador for the Millennium Development Goals.

What came out of it? Casillas managed to create a pretty good Personal Brand around himself, as it was reflected in the research by Personality Media, and actually some advertisting contracts with well-known companies such as Liga BBVA and Procter & Gamble.

iker champu

So far so good, till recently… The misstep came two weeks ago when he published a picture of his new-born baby, one “follower” attacked the baby (he basically said that he wished the baby would drown) and Casillas replied with all kind swearing and curse words…

comentario-iker

Had Casillas the right to response back like that? Yes, of course. Was Casillas right when responding like that? Absolutely not. Casillas needs to understand that even if he has the right to do so, he has created a Personal Brand, needs to protect it, take good care about what he does and does not say in public and specially take care of Media and Digital Media. For whatever he says, specially if it is a misstep, is going to be viral and promoted all around the Globe…

 

LEBRON GOES BACK HOME

The story of Lebron is somewhat similar to the one of Iker Casillas in a bigger scale. His Personal Branding started when he was only 17 and made it in the cover of Sports Illustrated: The Chosen one was born.

lebron the chosen one

Number 1 of the NBA draft in 2003, he was really up to the expectations he raised and managed to beat quite a few records during his 7 years in the Cavs, with only something missing: An NBA Championship. In 2010, he became an unrestricted agent and had to decide whether to keep on playing in Cleveland or moving somewhere else… Everybody was awaiting and he finally made his move… A move that he announced in an ESPN TV Program (The Decision)…

YouTube Preview Image

Did he have the right to look for another Team where to win the NBA Championship? Of course. Did he mange it properly from a communication perspective? Definitively not. It was considered a brutal communication misstep, an arrogant move that made him a public enemy in Cleveland and in the minds of big chunk of NBA followers (myself included).

4 years later, Lebron was facing the same situation again. He had spent 4 years with the Heats, won 2 NBA Championships, had the right to choose his team again and got everybody was awaiting his decision. And today, he announced his decision and, in contrast to what happened before, he communicated it smartly: He wrote a well-thought and respectful letter published by Sports Illustrated, where he exposes the reasons for “I´m coming back home”.

lebron coming home

The reactions are yet to come, but I can bet that his Personal Brand Image will be strongly reinforced for:

  • He has amended his previous mistakes.
  • He admits the communication mistakes he made in the past.
  • He comes across as a respectful and considerate person, that looks for something else.

SOME CLOSING THOUGHTS

  • Personal Branding has to do with who you are and specially with how you come across.
  • For the latter Media in a broad sense is critical and needs to be carefully thought and manged.
  • When being a well-known Personal Brand, you need to be mindful and aware that everything your claim is subject to be published, promoted and made viral. This works both for offline and online media.
  • Having said that, you need to define your values and positioning and stick to them, even if rational or irrational critics show up.
  • And last but not least, please consider a professional assessment for managing your Personal Brand. Brand Management well deserves some professional help.

personal branding

Look forward for your comments @ignaciogafo.

Reset!!!

Ignacio Gafo

22
Jun

Can you disrupt the market with a best-in-class shopping experience? Amazon thinks so.

Marketing and Strategy books claim that you should strive to create a Monopoly, to come up with a Blue Ocean where no competition takes place. This approach is also know as becoming a Game Changer, breaking the existing rules and coming up with something that sets you appart.

blue ocean

When analyzing companies that have managed to do so, we mainly encounter companies that came up with innovative products, that outperformed everything available in the market. However, as competition and globalization evolve, this has turned out to be more and more difficult and nowadays, most companies happen to succeed through innovations in the Business Model (Google) or Customer Experience (Apple with the I-phone).

In this context, Amazon has just launched its new Fire Smartphone, an expected move  supported by analysts, that enview it as a Game Changing through a top-notch shoppping experience.

amazon_customer_service

Is it the case?

Before responding, let´s analyze brevely what they have launched and where does Amazon stand.

The launch has been somewhat different from the one done with the Kindle Fire Tablet for two reasons:

a) The smartphone is a top-class one from a spec perspective (compared to a stripped down version from the initial Kindle Fire tablets).

b) The street price has not been undercut (which was the case with the Kindle Fire tablet).

YouTube Preview Image

The latter is basically telling us that Amazon feels more comfortable about its positioning and confident to demand somewhat similar prices than those from Apple and Samsung.

In this regard, it is fair to say that Amazon has done an impressive job in terms of attracting its customer base (mainly the in US) and getting app developers on board (you can now download more than 300k apps through the Amazon Portal), whilst providing a state-of-the-art shopping experience

Being this the case, I do think that Amazon is taking a reasonable risk, that sets the basis for its long term strategy: Reaping the benefits of a loyal customer base, that is expected to keep on purchasing from Amazon, even when discounting is not applied.

Amazon-Phone

My first guess is that the initial results will be positive but will not tell if the bet works. This will be the case for the Phone will be just launched in the US with AT&T, which is where Amazon is stronger and gets most of its loyal customer base. The challenges will show up in the mid-term, when they need to go beyond the american market and convince other markets (like Europe) to pay full price for an Amazon device.

And my second guess is that this will be an all or nothing initiative. For if they are unable to reach in two years to a critical customer base, key app developers and distributors (mainly Telecom Companies) will stop supporting them.

Time to time then. But let´s welcome Amazon Phone on board!

Reset!!!

Ignacio Gafo

PS: This post is dedicated to Teresa Serra, my mentor at IE Business School, and to all my loyal blog readers that have being patient with me. Sorry about so many months without posting. Just needed a small break to Reset!!! and go beyond Think Different!!!

28
Apr

En un entorno de marcas y consumidores hiperconectados se debate con asiduidad sobre la necesidad de que las marcas dialoguen con sus consumidores . El objetivo parece claro: establecer una relación más fluida y continua en el tiempo.

Se habla de dialogar, de conectar, de storytelling; de crear contenidos, de distribuir contenidos, de conseguir recomendaciones, word of mouth, de seguidores, likes, tweets, retweets …

Buscamos community managers, SEO y SEM managers, creamos attribution models y pensamos qué contenido será mejor para atraer más consumidores, más clicks y generar más difusión e impacto.

Sin embargo, en la mayoría de las estrategias de las marcas echo de menos una palabra mágica: empatía.

Para establecer una relación duradera entre personas o entre un marca y sus consumidores no sólo es necesario dialogar, es necesario dialogar mostrando empatía.

El dialogo sin empatía puede ser correcto, circunstancial, incluso muy frecuente; nos hace ser conocidos pero no construye sólidos vínculos afectivos ni entre las personas ni entre las marcas y sus consumidores .

Mostrar empatía significa comprender y tener la palabra justa ante los sentimientos de las personas , anticipar sus reacciones y compartir sus momentos. La empatía implica capacidad de escuchar y de expresar al otro que le hemos entendido, que podemos ver las cosas desde su punto de vista, no sólo desde el nuestro.

Traducido al lenguaje del marketing es importante resaltar que mostrar empatía no es lo mismo que descubrir “insights”. Los insights son revelaciones puntuales para las marcas que les ayudan a hacerse visibles, presentes y relevantes en la consideración de los consumidores.

La empatía es lo que hace que un “insight “perdure en el tiempo y se convierta en una ventaja competitiva sostenible.

Por mi experiencia profesional en marketing e innovación considero de un enorme mérito la estrategia llevada a cabo por la marca Dove en estos años. Alguna vez ya he comentado al respecto en este blog

Sin embargo, lo que más me llama la atención de esta marca es su capacidad de empatía.

Me gustaría que viesen estos tres anuncios.

Probablemente el primero ya lo conocen, Dove Sketches.

YouTube Preview Image

Quizas los otros dos aún no. Dove Selfie y Dove Shy. Echenles un vistazo.

YouTube Preview Image YouTube Preview Image

La transición del primero a los dos últimos es fenomenal.

Para Dove hubiese sido mucho más “simple” exprimir al máximo su exitosa campaña Sketches, buscando mas posibilidades creativas de “sketches”, nuevos targets mas jóvenes; diseñar concursos, promociones y tweets sobre los “sketches” de los consumidores y un sinfín de prolongaciones de la campaña que ustedes pueden imaginar…. Pero esto, aunque diálogo, no es empatía. Sin embargo, con estas nuevas comunicaciones Dove dialoga con sus consumidores con una nueva perspectiva, demuestra que conoce de lo que está hablando, empatiza con sus consumidores mostrando que sabe como se sienten o como se han sentido.

Desde el punto de vista estratégico para la marca el avance es inmejorable. Un target más joven, un tono menos dramático , más alegre y positivo.

Con los buenos amigos las conversaciones no se repiten hasta el aburrimiento. Descubrimos nuevas perspectivas. Hablando con ellos, nos conocemos mejor.

 

Espero que tengan una buena semana, seguiremos dialogando

 

puedes seguir la conversación en @carmenabril1

 

19
Feb

Desde el Retail

Deloitte publica anualmente el informe Global Powers of Retailing, donde se recoge el ranking de las 250 primeras cadenas detallistas a nivel mundial.

Del ranking del informe 2014, correspondiente a los ejercicios fiscales 2012-2013, se derivan algunos cambios sustanciales en sus posiciones principales si lo comparamos con el del año anterior. Los más relevantes serían la pérdida de dos puestos por parte de Carrefour, que pasa de la 2ª a la 4ª plaza como resultado de la venta de su enseña Dia, y la pérdida de 3 posiciones por Metro, que pasa de la 4ª a la 7ª como consecuencia también de la venta de algunas divisiones de su formato Cash&Carry. En el sentido contrario, Tesco asciende a la segunda posición y Costco a la tercera. Pero en resumen, todos los que estaban entre los diez primeros, salvo Walgreen, se mantienen.

2014

Para verlo con una mayor perspectiva temporal podemos compararlo con el ranking correspondiente al informe del año 2009. Los cambios más relevantes serían el continuo ascenso de Costco (de la posición 9 en 2009 a la 3ª en 2014) y la entrada entre los 20 primeros grupos de Aeon Co (13º), Woolworths (15º), Westfarmers (19º) y Casino (20º). Pero entre los movimientos más notorios sería la entrada de Amazon en esta lista de los top 20, al ascender desde el puesto 55 al 16 en solo cinco años.

Algunos temas destacables serían los siguientes

  • Las enseñas que operan con formatos y posicionamientos discount acaparan una importancia creciente, contando ya con tres grupos entre los diez primeros (Schwarz Lidl, Aldi y Target). Igualmente habría que destacar el peso creciente de formatos Cash&Carry y Warehouse Clubs (Costco y Metro).
  • Se sigue dando un bajo nivel de globalización entre las 20 empresas líderes, al tener presencia en un promedio de 12.5 países (frente a 10.0 países de media para el conjunto de 250 grupos incluidos en el informe). Adicionalmente el crecimiento en esta presencia internacional es relativamente bajo, ya que en el informe 2013 la media era de 11.9 países. Entre las diez primeras empresas ninguna aumenta su presencia internacional en comparación con el año anterior, y dos de ellas (Carrefour y Metro) incluso la reducen. Sorprendentemente, algo más de un tercio de las 250 mayores empresas del mundo operan solo en un país.
  • Conectado con el punto anterior, solo un 32% de las ventas de los diez primeros detallistas provienen de fuera de su país de origen, dato que es casi diez puntos superior al correspondiente a los 250 grupos de distribución considerados en el informe. Destacar también el mayor nivel de internacionalización de las empresas europeas presentes entre las diez más grandes, en las que todas, salvo la inglesa Tesco, obtienen más de la mitad de sus ventas de operaciones internacionales.
  • Menor nivel de rentabilidad de las empresas con mayores ventas, estando el margen de las diez primeras 0.3 puntos por debajo del de las 250 mayores del mundo (2.8% vs 3.1%) como resultado de operar con formatos de distribución más conectados con el eje precio, como puedan ser formatos discount e hipermercados
  • Asia y Oceania, y principalmente Japón,  suponen el 24% de las mayores empresas de distribución detallista (60 entre las 250 mayores del mundo), si bien con un menor peso en las ventas totales generadas (15.1%) resultado de tener solamente 4 empresas asiáticas entre las 50 primeras del mundo

Si nos centramos en detallistas con venta a través de internet, por primera vez considerados específicamente en el análisis de Deloitte, algunas conclusiones incluidas en el informe serían las siguientes:

  • Casi el 80% de las 50 primeras empresas de venta online pertenecen a grupos incluidos entre las 250 primeras empresas de distribución.
  • El 84% de las empresas online tienen o son resultado de una estrategia multicanal, y solo 8 entre las 50 primeras venden únicamente a través de la web
  • Un  21% de las 250 mayores empresas detallistas todavía no tienen un sitio web como canal de venta. Entre el total de empresas, la venta online genera solo un 8% de la cifra de ventas, si bien dado su fuerte crecimiento (+25%) en comparación con de las 250 empresas que componen el informe (4.9%) esta cifra tiene un fuerte y rápido recorrido al alza

Saludos muy cordiales

30
Nov

Big Asian countries, such as China and India, are attracting the attention of companies in a variety of industries. Typically, two kinds of business opportunities are being pursued in these countries. First, many companies (e.g., IBM, Adidas, P&G, etc. – the list is really endless) transfer there some or all of their operations simply to benefit from lower production costs. Second, as the residents of these two countries represent roughly 50% of the total planet population, many companies are entering these markets  in attempt to grow their consumer base. From financial services to pharma, there seems to be something for every business domain.

As smart and profitable as the above practices may be, they are still a bit shallow (or shortsighted as a McKinsey article argues). A closer look reveals an important 3rd business opportunity; The tremendous cultural heritage of both India and China can provide excellent business prospects for companies who wish to be a bit more adventurous and seize opportunities as they arise.

But who would be the customers for such “culturally loaded” products? Well, first, an important part of Europeans and Americans find Asia as an exotic place, and they could welcome some of this “exotic-ness” to their lives. This is evident from both hard-numbers (Indian exports to USA alone are worth about USD 40 Billion) and softer consumer observation perspectives (e.g., influences of a recent Jean Paul Gaultiers collection).

But that is not all. With the modernization of the economies, many multinational firms now have significant offices in India and/or China. The executives of these companies, can be either locals, who have climbed up all the way to the corporate ladder, or expats, who were brought in by their companies in order to bring to these new markets their expertise. Both these types of people are interesting niche markets. The first, living and working in a westernized environment, may feel a little disconnected from their cultural origins. The second, living and working in a far away country, may try hard to “blend it”. No matter if their initial motive, is connecting to the past, blending in, or simply finding signature corporate gifts for their companies, they are very likely to seek for products that carry some cultural meaning of the country they live in. These products, then, could be used either by the executives themselves, or as corporate gifts of the companies they work for, which perhaps also want to communicate “original local identity”

Elements is a company that tries to seize this opportunity. The idea behind Elements was born by a team in which two IE alumni, Aman Goel and Gustavo Salinas, belong. Elements presents a unique approach to marketing hand-made Indian handicrafts, trying to connect rural Indian artisans and the culture their crafts carry, with the mainstream markets.

Aman and Gustavo explained to me the idea in greater detail.

“Indian handicrafts have been appreciated in India and abroad for a long time and already claim a market size of over USD 5 Billion. However, Elements believes, that the potential market for Indian handicrafts is much bigger. Indian artisans, for centuries, have been making the same products with same designs. So, while the world has become more modern and fast paced, Indian handicrafts have not evolved to suit the tastes of modern customers. Especially for the corporate clients, the gifts are seen as a medium building relationships with clients and employees. Therefore, the gifts not only require to communicate the company’s philosophy but also be unique. However, the corporate gifting industry in India is dominated by small regional traders who mostly import gift items from China leaving minimal scope for customization. This is where Elements brings in its expertise to adapt and contemporize traditional designs that are tailor made for each company and that carry the story of arts and artisans who have made the product. The enclosed image shows a business card holder developed by Elements using traditional Tarkashi art (metal wire inlay in wood), which has traditionally been used in making festive boxes.

El_Card holder

 

 

El_Logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

Furthermore, Elements also works closely with the artisans, in order to guarantee authenticity and reliable delivery of the crafts. If needed, it provides the artisans with tools and raw material to improve their production efficiency while reducing their financial burden. In addition, close cooperation helps building strong relationships and allows passing to the artisans maximum benefits from a sale. The video that follows is indicative of this close relationship.”

YouTube Preview Image

 

Overall, though still in early stages, Elements shows that countries like India and China offer interesting market opportunities that do not necessarily rely on cheaper cost of production, but rather build on the value that products from these countries can deliver.

Do you think of any other similar business opportunities?

You can read more about Elements at:

Website: www.esbv.org

Facebook: www.facebook.com/elementsmart

Blog: www.elementsmart.tumblr.com

 

Antonios (Adoni) Stamatogiannakis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Marketing
IE Business School – IE University

Antonios . Stamatogiannakis @ ie . edu

 

1
Oct

I am not worried about the buzz that says Apple is not as innovative as it used  to be in the past. This company has disrupted three different markets in just ten years. Most companies are not able to do it even once in their history.

I am also not worried  about the fact that Apple stock value has decreased so heavily. They have more cash than they’ve ever dream of.

I am worried about one problem that is reflected in two anecdotes:

  1. The most popular comment about iOS7 is …..how similar it is to Samsung’s interface.
  2. As heavy Apple consumer, I have never carried out more different plugs in my entire life

Haven’t you experienced these issues?

These two anecdotes are strong symptoms of a deeper problem from my point of view : Apple is losing its DNA.

Some Apple’s DNA genomes:

 

genome

-       Simplicity, Taste

  • I like this quote from Pascal 1656  “ I have only made this letter rather long because I have not had time to make it shorter” . Simplicity as Apple understood it requires a strong focus and leadership.
  •  Apple devoted a huge effort in the past to avoid superficial product features and to deliver true value to its consumers. This has been a key component of Apple’s culture reflected in their product and ecosystem design.
  • I am not sure Simplicity  is in Apple DNA anymore…
  • Gold I phone is great for China, however I am not sure if it is related to what Jobs called “taste”..

-       Outstanding consumer experience

  • Investor’s or consumer experiences?
  • Who is deciding the pace of Apple innovation, the consumer’s needs or the investor’s needs?
  • Who should be driving the agenda? Apple should announce news when they are ready to hit the market, not just because September is coming. The pace of innovation is not predictable, and sometimes is not even sustainable. Innovative companies know it.
  • Put first the value to the consumer,  the stock value will come short after.

-       Strong personality , Out of the norm

  • What is Apple’s image on young people? It is comparable to that of Apple’s early adopters?
  • Is Apple spirit started to be confounded with fashion?

Look at how Surface is pointing out this sensitive area in their recent communication

YouTube Preview Image

I believe Apple is one of the most beloved and strong brands in the world. But this is precisely why they need a Time Out.

Breath, Take some air, Re cap, Recover the passion, Commit to the vision …and then…. Beat the market again.

 

Your point of view?

 

Have a nice weekend

 

@carmenabril1

8
Sep

Volvemos después de un necesitado descanso. El verano ha dejado muchas cosas tras de sí y tenemos mucho que comentar por delante. Y hoy quiero empezar haciéndolo con el reposicionamiento de Lady Gaga y Hannah Montana (Miley Cyrus).

Jeff Kravitz

Aunque ninguna de las dos necesitan presentación, os hago un esbozo del punto de partida:

  • Lady Gaga es un icono musical, con un excelente posicionamiento entre veinteañeros y grupos alternativos, logrado entre otras cosas a golpe de performance. Entendiendo como performance su capacidad para sorprendernos una y otra vez con disfraces imposibles. De tal manera que llegó a un punto en el que ya daba igual lo que dijera o cantara, lo que esperábamos y queríamos ver era con qué nuevo look aparecía.
  • Miley Cyrus era hasta hace poco un icono contrapuesto. Fruto de la fábrica Disney, era más conocida como Hannah Montana, icono adorado por el público adolescente y que encarnaba los mejores valores familiares y tradicionales.

hannah montana

Iconos de gran éxito las dos por lo tanto, con una imagen muy bien definida y un problema en común: Las dos parecían haber agotado su recorrido, y necesitaban evolucionar. En el caso de Lady Gaga, por motivos de salud (su atuenda atentaba contra su salud), la imposibilidad de estar toda la vida deslumbrando, y la necesidad de llegar a un público más amplio. Y en de Miley Cyrus, para explotar sus dotes artísticas, llegar a un público más adulto, posicionarse a sí misma como artista más madura, y hacer olvidar a la buena de Hannah Montana.

Ante esto, ¿qué ha hecho cada una?

La aproximación de Lady Gaga ha sido bastante inteligente. Después de una forzosa retirada de los escenarios (y de los medios sociales) por motivos de salud, rompió de repente su silencio con un look sorprendente, que ha ido mostrando poco a poco: Su look natural. Es decir, una imagen sin disfraces, aunque manteniendo su discurso alternativo e integrador para con sus “little monsters”.

lady gaga normal

En definitiva, se ha reposicionado sin renunciar a atributos base, que hacen que su público no se haya sentido alienado y abrace el cambio, mientras migra a una imagen sostenible y de mayor alcance.

Y en el otro extremo tenemos Miley Cyrus. Hablo de otro extremo pues su camino va en sentido exactamente contrario al de Lady Gaga, y ha sido completamente desacertado.  Porque en el mundo del Marketing en general, el cómo puede llegar a ser incluso más importante que el qué; y aunque el qué tenga sentido, un cómo mal diseñado puede ser devastador…

Que es lo que a mi entender, sucedió en los premios de la MTV con un show esperpéntico, en el que efectivamente dejó claro que Hannah Montana había muerto, para dar paso a una suerte de pelele de mal gusto y bastante vulgar:

YouTube Preview Image

Dicen que Miley Cyrus sabía perfectamente lo que hizo. Creo que no. Hizo lo que le dijeron sus asesores, pero no era consciente de los efectos de la actuación… No dijo que la escena no sea remontable, pero sí que va a tener mucho mucho trabajo para hacerlo olvidar…

Con lo que adelante con las reinvenciones y reposicionamientos, , pero cuidando en detalle el cómo, no sea que nazca algo indeseado.

Espero vuestros comentarios en @ignaciogafo.

THINK DIFFERENT!!!

Ignacio Gafo

10
Aug

Young males, living in big cities…

Written on August 10, 2013 by Antonios Stamatogiannakis in ADVERTISING, International Marketing

In several of my classes, this is how students (especially those with little marketing training) describe market segments for a product or service; Gender, age (or age range), and geographical location. Then the discussion goes on with me explaining that such description is inadequate, or even misleading, and that a more appropriate description should include “psychographic” and/ or “behavioral” elements as well. At this point, I sense several students wondering: “What does this mean?” “What is psychographic, anyway?” “What is the use of this, besides learning more fancy marketing buzzwords?”

Well, here is an excellent example from McDonald’s advertisements in China that shows why. The target segment of McDonald’s is exactly: “young males, living in big cities”. These are the people who are more likely to opt for fast food versus other, more expensive or time-consuming eating options. This targeting was reflected in a controversial campaign that provided discounts to male customers only.

When however MacDonald’s had to decide on the advertising, they realized that “young males, living in big cities” see themselves differently, and aspire for very different things depending on the big city that they live in. Thus, in their “Manly Man” campaign, McDonald’s created different ads for different cities, trying to appeal to characteristics of the target segment deeper than “gender, age, location.” Some of these characteristics were very common among young males (e.g., interest in females), but others were tailored to the specific image of a “Manly Man” in different regions of China.
Young males living in Shenzhen, the first “special economic zone” in China, saw an advertisement stressing the importance of career in a man’s life:

YouTube Preview Image

Young males living in Shanghai, where a man must take good care of his wife and home, saw an advertisement stressing these qualities:

YouTube Preview Image

And young males living in Beijing, saw an advertisement stressing that real men are tough and decisive:

YouTube Preview Image

Interestingly, regardless of whether the focus is on career achievement, care-taking, or toughness, the slogan is always the same: “Manly Man”. Thus, the different foci of the ads do not merely reflect differences in how desirable some traits are in different parts of China. Rather, they show that these characteristics (successful, care-taker, tough) define what a “manly man” is in each of these cities, at a deeper “psychographic” and “behavioral” level.

 

Antonios (Adoni) Stamatogiannakis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Marketing
IE Business School – IE University

antonios.stamatogiannakis@ie.edu

27
Jul

Congratulatory messages are flooding in from around the world to mark the birth of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s son, the third in line to the throne.

Which is a unique occasion for the BRANDS to join the congratulation showing off how creative they can be + engage with their customers.

I am enclosing a sample of the Advertising carried out. I look forward knowing your favourite one.

 

J&J

royal george j&j

 

 

COKE

 royal george coke

 

OREO

royal george oreo

 

 MINI

Mini Royalty has arrived video

 

MAGNUM

royal george magnum

 

 

CHARMIN

royal george charmin 

 

DELTA

royal george delta 

 

GRANOLA

royal george granola 

 

HOSTESS SNACK

royal george hostess snacks 

 

MUMM

royal george hMumm

 

SMURFS

 royal george smurfs

 

STARBUCKS

royal george sb

 

 

Look forward for your comments here or @ignaciogafo.

THINK DIFFERENT!!!

Ignacio Gafo

4
Jul

How should you manage a traditional business like a Retail Store?

How far should you go in terms of online sales? What is the right balance between online and brick-and-mortar stores?

How shall you play in terms of global branding versus local heritage?

How to incorporate new technologies in order to enhance customer experience?

ahold supermarket

Ahold CEO, Dick Boer, explains in this interview from Mc Kinsey how he successfully managed to reshape Ahold business.

Some points to be considered would be :
- The importance of focusing on what you are really good at.

- Power to innovation… provided it will reinforce your positioning and provide with an enhanced customer experience.

- Do not get obsessed with Global Branding. Global Brands are not the best choice for all Industries.

ahold

- CSV can also take place in retailing. In this case, in what has been termed Responsible Retailing.

- Conflicts are going to be there. You should not escape from them but look for the right trade off.

- Last but not least, give things a trial. Step by step approaches are very sensible choice.

ahold brands

Ahold seems to be in the right track by focusing on their customers and their postioning. whilst keeping an eye on continuous improvement.

Good approach for Retail Busines, that will definitively give an edge to Ahold over other traditional players.

Look forward for your comments @ignaciogafo

THINK DIFFERENT!!!

Ignacio Gafo

PS: Sorry not not posting as usual. It has been quite hectic but I promise to come back to the usual delivery rates.

1 2 3 24