Posts Tagged ‘International Marketing#8217;

30
Nov

Big Asian countries, such as China and India, are attracting the attention of companies in a variety of industries. Typically, two kinds of business opportunities are being pursued in these countries. First, many companies (e.g., IBM, Adidas, P&G, etc. – the list is really endless) transfer there some or all of their operations simply to benefit from lower production costs. Second, as the residents of these two countries represent roughly 50% of the total planet population, many companies are entering these markets  in attempt to grow their consumer base. From financial services to pharma, there seems to be something for every business domain.

As smart and profitable as the above practices may be, they are still a bit shallow (or shortsighted as a McKinsey article argues). A closer look reveals an important 3rd business opportunity; The tremendous cultural heritage of both India and China can provide excellent business prospects for companies who wish to be a bit more adventurous and seize opportunities as they arise.

But who would be the customers for such “culturally loaded” products? Well, first, an important part of Europeans and Americans find Asia as an exotic place, and they could welcome some of this “exotic-ness” to their lives. This is evident from both hard-numbers (Indian exports to USA alone are worth about USD 40 Billion) and softer consumer observation perspectives (e.g., influences of a recent Jean Paul Gaultiers collection).

But that is not all. With the modernization of the economies, many multinational firms now have significant offices in India and/or China. The executives of these companies, can be either locals, who have climbed up all the way to the corporate ladder, or expats, who were brought in by their companies in order to bring to these new markets their expertise. Both these types of people are interesting niche markets. The first, living and working in a westernized environment, may feel a little disconnected from their cultural origins. The second, living and working in a far away country, may try hard to “blend it”. No matter if their initial motive, is connecting to the past, blending in, or simply finding signature corporate gifts for their companies, they are very likely to seek for products that carry some cultural meaning of the country they live in. These products, then, could be used either by the executives themselves, or as corporate gifts of the companies they work for, which perhaps also want to communicate “original local identity”

Elements is a company that tries to seize this opportunity. The idea behind Elements was born by a team in which two IE alumni, Aman Goel and Gustavo Salinas, belong. Elements presents a unique approach to marketing hand-made Indian handicrafts, trying to connect rural Indian artisans and the culture their crafts carry, with the mainstream markets.

Aman and Gustavo explained to me the idea in greater detail.

“Indian handicrafts have been appreciated in India and abroad for a long time and already claim a market size of over USD 5 Billion. However, Elements believes, that the potential market for Indian handicrafts is much bigger. Indian artisans, for centuries, have been making the same products with same designs. So, while the world has become more modern and fast paced, Indian handicrafts have not evolved to suit the tastes of modern customers. Especially for the corporate clients, the gifts are seen as a medium building relationships with clients and employees. Therefore, the gifts not only require to communicate the company’s philosophy but also be unique. However, the corporate gifting industry in India is dominated by small regional traders who mostly import gift items from China leaving minimal scope for customization. This is where Elements brings in its expertise to adapt and contemporize traditional designs that are tailor made for each company and that carry the story of arts and artisans who have made the product. The enclosed image shows a business card holder developed by Elements using traditional Tarkashi art (metal wire inlay in wood), which has traditionally been used in making festive boxes.

El_Card holder

 

 

El_Logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

Furthermore, Elements also works closely with the artisans, in order to guarantee authenticity and reliable delivery of the crafts. If needed, it provides the artisans with tools and raw material to improve their production efficiency while reducing their financial burden. In addition, close cooperation helps building strong relationships and allows passing to the artisans maximum benefits from a sale. The video that follows is indicative of this close relationship.”

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Overall, though still in early stages, Elements shows that countries like India and China offer interesting market opportunities that do not necessarily rely on cheaper cost of production, but rather build on the value that products from these countries can deliver.

Do you think of any other similar business opportunities?

You can read more about Elements at:

Website: www.esbv.org

Facebook: www.facebook.com/elementsmart

Blog: www.elementsmart.tumblr.com

 

Antonios (Adoni) Stamatogiannakis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Marketing
IE Business School – IE University

Antonios . Stamatogiannakis @ ie . edu

 

10
Aug

Young males, living in big cities…

Written on August 10, 2013 by Antonios Stamatogiannakis in ADVERTISING, International Marketing

In several of my classes, this is how students (especially those with little marketing training) describe market segments for a product or service; Gender, age (or age range), and geographical location. Then the discussion goes on with me explaining that such description is inadequate, or even misleading, and that a more appropriate description should include “psychographic” and/ or “behavioral” elements as well. At this point, I sense several students wondering: “What does this mean?” “What is psychographic, anyway?” “What is the use of this, besides learning more fancy marketing buzzwords?”

Well, here is an excellent example from McDonald’s advertisements in China that shows why. The target segment of McDonald’s is exactly: “young males, living in big cities”. These are the people who are more likely to opt for fast food versus other, more expensive or time-consuming eating options. This targeting was reflected in a controversial campaign that provided discounts to male customers only.

When however MacDonald’s had to decide on the advertising, they realized that “young males, living in big cities” see themselves differently, and aspire for very different things depending on the big city that they live in. Thus, in their “Manly Man” campaign, McDonald’s created different ads for different cities, trying to appeal to characteristics of the target segment deeper than “gender, age, location.” Some of these characteristics were very common among young males (e.g., interest in females), but others were tailored to the specific image of a “Manly Man” in different regions of China.
Young males living in Shenzhen, the first “special economic zone” in China, saw an advertisement stressing the importance of career in a man’s life:

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Young males living in Shanghai, where a man must take good care of his wife and home, saw an advertisement stressing these qualities:

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And young males living in Beijing, saw an advertisement stressing that real men are tough and decisive:

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Interestingly, regardless of whether the focus is on career achievement, care-taking, or toughness, the slogan is always the same: “Manly Man”. Thus, the different foci of the ads do not merely reflect differences in how desirable some traits are in different parts of China. Rather, they show that these characteristics (successful, care-taker, tough) define what a “manly man” is in each of these cities, at a deeper “psychographic” and “behavioral” level.

 

Antonios (Adoni) Stamatogiannakis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Marketing
IE Business School – IE University

antonios.stamatogiannakis@ie.edu

27
Jul

Congratulatory messages are flooding in from around the world to mark the birth of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s son, the third in line to the throne.

Which is a unique occasion for the BRANDS to join the congratulation showing off how creative they can be + engage with their customers.

I am enclosing a sample of the Advertising carried out. I look forward knowing your favourite one.

 

J&J

royal george j&j

 

 

COKE

 royal george coke

 

OREO

royal george oreo

 

 MINI

Mini Royalty has arrived video

 

MAGNUM

royal george magnum

 

 

CHARMIN

royal george charmin 

 

DELTA

royal george delta 

 

GRANOLA

royal george granola 

 

HOSTESS SNACK

royal george hostess snacks 

 

MUMM

royal george hMumm

 

SMURFS

 royal george smurfs

 

STARBUCKS

royal george sb

 

 

Look forward for your comments here or @ignaciogafo.

THINK DIFFERENT!!!

Ignacio Gafo

4
Feb

Oreo reinventa la Superbowl

Written on February 4, 2013 by Ignacio Gafo in ADVERTISING, Branding, E-MARKETING, International Marketing

¿Cuál ha sido el mejor anuncio de la Superbowl?

Siento adelantarme a mi amigo Jesús Rebollo, pero no puedo dejar de escribir sobre los anuncios que se lanzaron ayer y preguntaros cuál ha sido el mejor.

Seguro que al igual que yo, habréis recibido un buen número de correos y artículos, en el que distintos medios y personas dan su opinión. Que si cuál ha sido el más entretenido, el más ingenioso, el más notorio, el más pobre, etc.

De lo que había visto, claramente me quedaba con el de Audi. Me parecía ingenioso, tenía llegada al público objetivo y encima trasmitía muy bien los valores de marca…

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Algo que no ha conseguido este año Bud, que para mí ha sido una gran decepción. Porque aunque como dice el New York Times es ciertamente entrañable, creo que la imagen que transmiten es muy soft y muy alejada de lo que uno espera de esta marca…

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Como os decía, me quedaba con Audi, hasta que llegó a mis manos un artículo de Sandro Pozzi, en el que se explicaba la GENIALIDAD (con mayúsculas) de Oreo. Que, aprovechando un apagón de 34 minutos en la final, colgó en Twitter el anuncio que teneís debajo:

Como os podéis imaginar, se ha llevado una de las mejores valoraciones el día después, además un sinfin de RT (14,000 RT el primer minuto). Lo que no es para menos pues evidencia varias cosas:

  • La importancia del momento. Las marcas tienen que estar “vivas” y conectar a tiempo real con los consumidores.
  • La importancia del marketing digital. Del Social Media en particular, que puede llevar a impactos superiores a los que consiguen las marcas invirtiendo muchos muchos millones (8 millones de US$ de media en la Superbowl).
  • La importancia de la creatividad. Puede que cambien los formatos; puede que cambie el consumidor; pero la capacidad de crear e innovar siempre estará ahí.
  • La importancia de la simplicidad. Menos es ciertamente más.

 

Espero vuestros comentarios e impresiones en @ignacio gafo y en @ieweblog.

 

THINK DIFFERENT!!!

Ignacio Gafo

 

PS1: Alguno me dirá que el apagón estaba programado. Con todo lo que está ocurriendo hoy, ya me creo que cualquier cosa. Pero esto rozaría lo inconcebible.

PS2: Gracias a mis alumnos del GMBABL y en especial a Adolfo, por despertarme la gusanillo y provocar este post.

28
Jan

It was a question of time before Starbucks enteered in to the singke-serve expresso machine business with its own end-to-end ecosystem.

The launch took place in the US last October, with a range of Verismo coffee machines and  different options plastic capsules filled with pre-ground coffee or powdered milk. It was not innovative at all, there were quite a few options avaialable at a market clearly dominated by Nestle´s Nespresso and Green Mountain’s Keurig. However, the chance to enter a market worth 8 billion US$ globally, that was expected to grow by 147% in 2012, seemed to convince Starbucks to make the bet.

Starbucks opted at the launch for a premium pricing ($200 and above for the coffee machines and $1 for the coffee capsule) over Nespresso ($150 and above for the machines and $0,75 the capsules), assuming that its Brand Loyalty and Preference would make the difference.

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Morevoer, it advertised heavily the product through Social Media and make the product available for purchase at Starbucks online store, its 4300 american stores stores and in a selection specialty stores.

Fiscal Q1 sales results have gone up to 150,000 machines according to the company, and Howard Schultz reminds me to Steve Jobs when commenting on the I-Pad first sales analysis:

“We remain committed to attaining leadership in the single-serve category, and I can tell you today that with Verismo we are in the nascent stage of building a multi-billion dollar platform for Starbucks over the long term,” said Schultz. “And we are in it for the long term.”

 

“I think it’s very important that you all understand that we are deeply, deeply committed to becoming the leader in this space domestically and internationally,” Schultz told the analysts.

 

“Our commitment, our interest, our motivation to build on single-serve and build on Verismo is 100 percent and we are going to maintain a high level of commitment and investment in this, where we are going to be the global leader,” he continued.

 

No question from my side about the Company commitment to this new business: The CEO and the company is fully committed and have actually promised new features, designs and alternatives already placed in the Verismo Roadmap for the next years.

But, at the same time, some “What if” questions show up in my mind:

- What if cannibalization from the Stores take place?

- What if after some early success coming from Starbucks fans, the sales drop?

- What if they are not able to cope with Nespresso´s brand equity and broader assortment of flavors in the mid and long term?

- What if it does not work when bringing the system out of US?

- What if the market matures at the time they are to compete?

- What if Sara Lee replicates what it did with Nespresso and launches capsules for Verismo as well?

I am a big marketing fan of Mr Schultz and believe he can make it happen again. However, the what if questions make me doubt whether Verismo creates or destroys value for Starbucks. At least for the time being…

I look forward for your comments and views @ignaciogafo / @ieweblog.

THINK DIFFERENT!!!

Ignacio Gafo

4
Dec

Retail banking has been severely hit by the crisis (for a related AT Kearney report click here: http://bit.ly/Tzr4k6). Naturally, banks operating in adverse environments might employ different approaches to reach consumers, compared to banks operating in healthier economies. Indeed, bank offerings differ across economies …but some of these differences are very subtle.

For instance, most banks that offer savings accounts require from consumers some sort of “maintenance”: The regular savings account of Barclays (UK-http://bit.ly/T9vaCP), offers higher interest rates if the balance of an account is maintained over a month. Similarly, Deutsche Bank (India) offers its Value-Plus savings account (http://bit.ly/UzDRT2) only if consumers maintain a minimum Average Quarterly Balance of Rs. 100,000 (1,420 euros).

                                                           

Interestingly, the Greek Piraeus bank, operating in a country severely hit by the crisis, chooses a different approach. Its savings account “Αξίζει” (i.e., it’s worth it), provides higher interest rates if an account balance increases over a month, even if the increase is as small as 1 euro (http://bit.ly/U80r91).

Even more interestingly, they “upgraded” this clause from the “small letters” to the basic selling point of the account! (Probably you do not speak Greek – but check seconds 34-40)

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Why did Piraeus Bank change the traditional approach of “balance maintenance” to “balance increase”? If anything, in today’s Greece it might be more difficult to increase your balance (even by 1 euro) than to maintain it.

My research* with professors Amitava Chattopadhyay (INSEAD, France & Singapore) and Dipankar Chakravarti (Johns Hopkins University, USA) provides a potential answer. In a series of studies we demonstrate that consumers think about the concepts of “increasing” versus “maintaining” very differently.

“Maintaining” evokes thoughts like “what factors might help or inhibit success in maintenance?” Naturally, when the economic environment is bad (e.g., Greece) such factors would lean towards the negative side, making the “maintain savings” task look a bit too difficult. On the contrary, “increasing” usually evokes thoughts like “what is the amount of the required increase?” By emphasizing that “one needs only 1 euro more to get a higher interest rate”, instead of simply requiring balance maintenance, Piraeus bank may be trying to prevent consumers from thinking about the negative economic environment, that would make any savings task look difficult, and its savings account unattractive.

To summarize, in times of economic recession, traditional marketing approaches (e.g., crafting customized bank offerings that best address the banking needs of well-defined segments) are necessary, but they may not be enough. They should be supplemented by consumer psychology insights. Simply giving the best offer may not be enough, if we do not know how consumers “read” this offer.

What are your thoughts on the above? Can you think of other similar approaches that may help consumer marketing in times of crisis?

 

Antonios (Adoni) Stamatogiannakis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Marketing
IE Business School – IE University

antonios.stamatogiannakis@ie.edu

*The Research leading to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions ) of the European Union´s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA grant agreement No. 298420.

8
Nov

Cuando no todo sale bien

Written on November 8, 2012 by Jesús Rebollo in Branding

Esta semana he tenido una de mis mejores experiencias como profesor en el IE Business School dentro del electivo de Sports Marketing que estoy dando a los alumnos del IMBA. En mi última clase analizamos las claves de un caso práctico en el que todo salía mal. Ni había estrategia, ni había definición de público objetivo y tampoco una estructura pensada para lograr ninguna de sus metas. El resultado, como no podía ser menos, es un estrepitoso fracaso.

La clase fue tan interesante que me quedé pensando sobre algo de lo que casi nunca hablamos aquí: de las peores prácticas e iniciativas dentro del mundo del marketing. Y buscando en la web he encontrado algunas que quiero compartir con vosotros.

1.- Una de las más recientes ya fue abordada por nuestro compañero Nacho Gafo. El famoso caso de Loewe  y su campaña viral de pijos absurdos hablando de su relación con la marca merecen un espacio en este ranking. Algunas de los expertos en redes sociales y e-marketing con los que he hablado venden este concepto en base a la notoriedad que ha generado pero un análisis mínimamente más profundo nos hace pensar de otra forma: Los objetivos de cualquier acción de marketing que se realice deben, ante todo y sobre todo, NO perjudicar los valores esenciales de la marca. Y aquí las dudas son más que evidentes.

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2.- Me remonto muchos años atrás (1985) para ver cómo hasta los más grandes se equivocan… Y sino que se lo digan a Coca Cola. Seguro que todos lo habéis leído o escuchado. En ese momento, el gigante de la gaseosa lanzó el que debía ser su gran lanzamiento la “New Coke” que vendría a reemplazar a la tradicional Coke. El resultado fue un desastre. Su número de atención al cliente pasó de 400 llamadas a 1500 reclamaciones diarias y se recibieron hasta 400.000 cartas en la sede de Atlanta. A pesar de que después revertieron la situación, la sensación de sus clientes de que le estaban “traicionando” al cambiar la fórmula original hizo mover sus cimientos.

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3.- Gracias a las redes sociales, los grandes almacenes Kenneth Cole, cometieron un terrible error en la pasada primavera. Al tiempo que en el Norte de África se estaba desarrollando la Primavera Árabe (con todas sus consecuencias), los de KC lanzaron este mensaje en su cuenta de Twitter:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

De nuevo. No nos pasemos de listos. No queramos ir dónde no nos llaman y no perdamos nunca el foco del valor real de nuestra marca.

Podríamos seguir buscando y encontrando malas prácticas que nos enseñen todo lo que no debemos hacer para intentar no caer en los errores e intentar asegurar que nuestras campañas cumplen con todos los puntos de control que debemos verificar para no perjudicar nuestra marca.

Espero vuestros comentarios aquí o en @ieweblog y @jesusrebollog

Feliz puente a todos,

PD. Thank you to all my students for inspire me on this post. Hope you’ll find it useful!

22
Oct

Recuerdo una conferencia del Presidente de Phillip Morris en España hará unos dos años. En la misma, hablando del mercado del tabaco, planteó algo que me pareció muy interesante: El mercado estaba cambiando radicalmente, y sólo las empresas que se posicionaran en un extremo (en este caso, superpremium o en precio) iban a sobrevivir; por lo que los que se quedaran en medio iban a quedar en tierra de nadie y desposicionados…

La verdad es que en numerosas ocasiones he podido comprobar cómo dicha afirmación se ha hecho realidad en numerosos sectores, con innumerables marcas desposicionadas en el camino…

Y el otro día, viendo la nueva campaña de Mc Donalds en televisión, no pude evitar recordar esta afirmación… Así, si entramos en la página web de Mc Donalds, amén de las inevitables promociones de venta y de precio, encontramos sorprendentemente este COMPROMISO DE 13 PUNTOS:

01.  Que el 75% DE NUESTRA COMPRA PROCEDA DE PROVEEDORES ESPAÑOLES.

02.  Que nuestra carne 100% VACUNO PROVENGA EN SU MAYORIA DE GANADERÍAS ESPAÑOLAS. Actualmente nos suministran más de 30.000.

03. Invertir en la apertura de más de 60 NUEVOS RESTAURANTES en los próximos 3 años con una INVERSIÓN CERCANA A 160 MILLONES DE EUROS.

04.  Incentivar la AGRICULTURA LOCAL, INCREMENTANDO la compra de fruta y verdura procedente principalmente de la HUERTA ESPAÑOLA.

05.  Seguir aplicando voluntariamente CERTIFICACIONES EXTERNAS como la Q de Calidad, que avalen la gestión de calidad que ofrecemos en nuestros restaurantes.

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06. Generar 3.000 NUEVOS PUESTOS DE TRABAJO en 3 años que se sumarán a los más de 22.000 EMPLEOS ACTUALES.

07. Fomentar la ESTABILIDAD EN EL EMPLEO, mediante el mantenimiento de un 90% de nuestra contratación INDEFINIDA en las plantillas de nuestros RESTAURANTES.

08. Desarrollar profesionalmente a NUESTROS EMPLEADOS, para facilitar su PROMOCIÓN LABORAL. EL 100% de la GERENCIA de nuestros restaurantes procede de PROMOCIÓN INTERNA.

09. Apostar por la CONCILIACIÓN LABORAL Y PERSONAL y la IGUALDAD DE OPORTUNIDADES PARA TODOS NUESTROS EMPLEADOS, que nos ha sido reconocida por el certificado de Empresa Familiarmente Responsable (EFR ®).

10. Ayudar y acoger a FAMILIAS CON NIÑOS ENFERMOS construyendo dos nuevas CASAS RONALD McDONALD en España que se sumarán a las ya existentes en BARCELONA Y MÁLAGA, lo que permitirá cubrir la demanda de unas 1.000 familias anualmente.

11. Seguir apoyando a la FUNDACIÓN INFANTIL RONALD McDONALD® con una aportación mínima anual de 1 MILLÓN DE EUROS para contribuir al bienestar de los niños y sus familias.

12. Comunicar y continuar trabajando en el PERFIL NUTRICIONAL DE NUESTROS PRODUCTOS, teniendo como objetivo REDUCIR SAL, GRASAS Y AZÚCARES.

13. Fomentar el CONSUMO DE FRUTAS Y VERDURAS, a través de nuestras CAMPAÑAS DE TELEVISIÓN dirigidas a niños.

Un enfoque arriesgado pero inteligente, con el que tratan de quitarse la imagen de “comida chatarra”  y demás apelativos con los que normalmente se asocia a la cadena americana. Vamos, campaña de Branding con efectos a medio – largo plazo, en medio de una crisis sin paliativos y enfoques a corto…

Enfoque que, como os imagináis, contrasta al 100% con el de BURGER KING que, ante tal declaración de intenciones lo tiene claro: Carne, carne y más carne . Que si Whopper triple, que si Whopper en todas las varidades , que si Menú Burger King XXL, …Back to basics en toda regla (back to carne en este caso), aprovechando el devaneo de la competencia…

Dicho lo cual, you make your choice:  “EL SABOR DEL KING” de Burger King o “COMPARTIMOS MAS DE LO QUE IMAGINAS” DE Mc Donalds. ¡Lo que quieras!, pero en un extremo…

 

¿Y el resto? No lo sé la verdad. Hace ya tiempo que no sabemos de Wendys y semejantes…

 

Espero vuestros comentarios en @ieweblog o en @ignaciogafo.

 

THINK DIFFERENT!!!

 

Ignacio Gafo

16
Sep

I-PHONE 5: EVOLUTION OR REGRESSION?

Written on September 16, 2012 by Ignacio Gafo in Branding, Innovation, International Marketing

The I-Phone 5 was just launched some days ago, and this time I decided hold on to my thoughts and start analyzing the market reaction. Interestingly, when reading the opinion of different specialized media, all experts seem to agree with the headlines from The Guardian: “Apple’s iPhone 5 is brilliant – but not best in class“.

This is indeed a very interesting statement, considering that objectively speaking, the new model incorporates a big deal of new functionalities and improvements:

 

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Among others: Improved phone design (larger screen, thinnier, less weight), better performance (much better processor), functionalities (such as new software for pictures)  and updated operating system (new one incorporated).

SO WHAT IS GOING ON HERE?

Is it that the product was not properly introduced by Tim Cook?

Is it that competition has performed better than Apple and now you need a real breakthrough to make the difference?

Is it that they have mismanaged the communication and have filtered in advance too many features?

Is it that we are suffering the Jobs´syndrome and still need some evidence from Tim Cook that he can reivent the phone again?

Or is it simply that the expectations with Apple are so high that is almost impossible to be up to them?

 HOW DID THE STOCKMARKET REACT?

Not sure what were the reasons behind, but upon considering them, one would expect the stockmarket to drop Apple stockprice significanty, as long as they have been unable to meet expections…

But guess what has happened? Shares of Apple (AAPL) topped their day-old all-time high, hitting $696.82 Friday amid strong enthusiasm for the iPhone 5.

Ongoing speculation with Apple?

Different vision of investors versus specialized media (and techies)?

Not sure again about  the responses, but we certainly seem to have a mismatch between experts and investors..

 

HOW WILL THE I-PHONE PERFORM IN THE MID AND LONG TERM?

In my view, it will keep on leading worldwide sales within the smartphone segment and will keep on building brand loyalty for Apple, at least for the rest of this year.

What will come then is unclear to me. I am with The Guardian that the product is not a breakthrough but, if we ask the core Apple customers what they think, we might find out surprising responses that justify the stockmarket boost… Who knows, maybe non-product features are are more relevant than those specialists thought…

 

I look forward for your views and comments @ieweblog and @ignaciogafo.

 

THINK DIFFERENT!!!

Ignacio Gafo

 

24
Jun

Is there a Third Way in Business? Does it make sense to opt for a non-traditional marketing approach and satisfy stakeholders in a broad sense? Is there a necessary trade-off between business results and sustainability? Is it possible, in other words, to contribute at the same time to the company objectives and social growth?

I am positive there is a THIRD WAY in Business and Marketing. An alternative route to market by which companies can succeed in attaining their objectives while contributing to social growth and sustainability. One of the ways would be everything around Bottom of the Pyramid Business (if properly and ethically executed); and another one could certainly fall under Corporate Social Responsibility.

 

How to do it?  Pepsi shows the way with the LITER OF LIGHT CAMPAIGN

Pepsico in the Philippines is showing us the way with its Liter of Light Campaign.

Here is a brief of what they have done:

Pepsi Philippines has teamed up with My Shelter Foundation in a campaign that seeks funding from a global audience to bring the gift of light to low-income communities in the country.

The BBDO Guerrero created campaign backing the seasonal initiative launched with a “Give the Gift of Light” e-card and uses digital channels including video on YouTube and Facebook and Web banners to drive awareness. The e-card allows individuals to donate directly to the project at www.aliterofkight.org, the website carrying the solar lighting project’s new global identity, a Liter of Light.

Pepsi has been a supporter of the project under its previous Bottle of Light identity to provide innovative, low-cost, carbon-free lighting solution to low-income communities in the country. The initiative uses discarded plastic soft-drink bottles, which are filled with water and a small amount of bleach. The bottle then refracts the sun’s rays to produce daytime equivalent lighting equivalent to a 55-W electric bulb.

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What have been the results? Simply amazing for Society and Pepsi

The campaign, that was launched online and was later on based on augmented reality media, has turned out to be extremely successful:

v More than 20.000 bulbs installed

v Impressive PR coverage at world class media leaders like BBC, Tede, New York Times, etc.

v Expansion of the initiative to Uganda, Mumbai, Vietnam and Kenya.

v Coomendation given by the UN Climate Chief

 

 

In the words of Executive Secretary of UNFCC : “… something simple (and cheap) can make a difference in the quality of life of millions of people“. And, I would add, also makes a big difference for Pepsi´s Brand Positioning…

 

THINK DIFFERENT!!!

Ignacio Gafo

@IEWEBLOG

PS: Special thanks to Hamad Al Tabatabaei for sharing this initiative with me.

 

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