Posts Tagged ‘marketing trends#8217;

11
Jan

Hello again everyone,

It is a great pleasure for the IE team involved at the Health2Market initiative to announce that the Health2Market Seminar: “Cutting Edge Decision Making Tools for Entrepreneurs”, will be hosted at IE Business School / IE University on March 3rd 2014. This Seminar will be delivered by professor Dilney Gonçalves.

But why is this seminar important? Well, managing a business at its core involves making good decisions. While most entrepreneurs will seek training in techniques in specific functions of the business like finance, marketing, and accounting, few are trained in decision-making. While it is important to understand the techniques involved in running the business, it is just as important to be a good decision maker. This seminar will provide participants with the necessary knowledge and skills to structure a decision problem, generate options, and select the best alternative in a consistent and unbiased way, enabling them to make the best possible decisions in their business ventures.

The seminar will be useful for everyone who is involved with health-sciences related businesses. So if you (or anyone you know) fits this profile, please do register!

 

REGISTER NOW: http://www.health2market.eu/seminar/2/registration

Registration is Required! Registration Deadline: February 7th, 2014

Participation is free of charge!!!

In addition, Health2Market offers FREE OF CHARGE full e-training courses. The courses range from the basics of marketing strategy to tips on how to attract partners to full-scale business planning and will help you understand the dynamics of the market and how to pursue business venture. Whether you already have some experience in the business world, or even if you have never left the science lab, the courses are designed to be easily understood by anyone.

 

More about the Health2Market Seminar: “Cutting Edge Decision Making Tools for Entrepreneurs”: http://www.health2market.eu/seminar/2
More about Health2market e-training: http://elearning.health2market.eu/

More about Health2market: http://www.health2market.eu/

 

Antonios (Adoni) Stamatogiannakis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Marketing
IE Business School – IE University

Antonios . Stamatogiannakis @ ie . edu

30
Nov

Big Asian countries, such as China and India, are attracting the attention of companies in a variety of industries. Typically, two kinds of business opportunities are being pursued in these countries. First, many companies (e.g., IBM, Adidas, P&G, etc. – the list is really endless) transfer there some or all of their operations simply to benefit from lower production costs. Second, as the residents of these two countries represent roughly 50% of the total planet population, many companies are entering these markets  in attempt to grow their consumer base. From financial services to pharma, there seems to be something for every business domain.

As smart and profitable as the above practices may be, they are still a bit shallow (or shortsighted as a McKinsey article argues). A closer look reveals an important 3rd business opportunity; The tremendous cultural heritage of both India and China can provide excellent business prospects for companies who wish to be a bit more adventurous and seize opportunities as they arise.

But who would be the customers for such “culturally loaded” products? Well, first, an important part of Europeans and Americans find Asia as an exotic place, and they could welcome some of this “exotic-ness” to their lives. This is evident from both hard-numbers (Indian exports to USA alone are worth about USD 40 Billion) and softer consumer observation perspectives (e.g., influences of a recent Jean Paul Gaultiers collection).

But that is not all. With the modernization of the economies, many multinational firms now have significant offices in India and/or China. The executives of these companies, can be either locals, who have climbed up all the way to the corporate ladder, or expats, who were brought in by their companies in order to bring to these new markets their expertise. Both these types of people are interesting niche markets. The first, living and working in a westernized environment, may feel a little disconnected from their cultural origins. The second, living and working in a far away country, may try hard to “blend it”. No matter if their initial motive, is connecting to the past, blending in, or simply finding signature corporate gifts for their companies, they are very likely to seek for products that carry some cultural meaning of the country they live in. These products, then, could be used either by the executives themselves, or as corporate gifts of the companies they work for, which perhaps also want to communicate “original local identity”

Elements is a company that tries to seize this opportunity. The idea behind Elements was born by a team in which two IE alumni, Aman Goel and Gustavo Salinas, belong. Elements presents a unique approach to marketing hand-made Indian handicrafts, trying to connect rural Indian artisans and the culture their crafts carry, with the mainstream markets.

Aman and Gustavo explained to me the idea in greater detail.

“Indian handicrafts have been appreciated in India and abroad for a long time and already claim a market size of over USD 5 Billion. However, Elements believes, that the potential market for Indian handicrafts is much bigger. Indian artisans, for centuries, have been making the same products with same designs. So, while the world has become more modern and fast paced, Indian handicrafts have not evolved to suit the tastes of modern customers. Especially for the corporate clients, the gifts are seen as a medium building relationships with clients and employees. Therefore, the gifts not only require to communicate the company’s philosophy but also be unique. However, the corporate gifting industry in India is dominated by small regional traders who mostly import gift items from China leaving minimal scope for customization. This is where Elements brings in its expertise to adapt and contemporize traditional designs that are tailor made for each company and that carry the story of arts and artisans who have made the product. The enclosed image shows a business card holder developed by Elements using traditional Tarkashi art (metal wire inlay in wood), which has traditionally been used in making festive boxes.

El_Card holder

 

 

El_Logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

Furthermore, Elements also works closely with the artisans, in order to guarantee authenticity and reliable delivery of the crafts. If needed, it provides the artisans with tools and raw material to improve their production efficiency while reducing their financial burden. In addition, close cooperation helps building strong relationships and allows passing to the artisans maximum benefits from a sale. The video that follows is indicative of this close relationship.”

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Overall, though still in early stages, Elements shows that countries like India and China offer interesting market opportunities that do not necessarily rely on cheaper cost of production, but rather build on the value that products from these countries can deliver.

Do you think of any other similar business opportunities?

You can read more about Elements at:

Website: www.esbv.org

Facebook: www.facebook.com/elementsmart

Blog: www.elementsmart.tumblr.com

 

Antonios (Adoni) Stamatogiannakis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Marketing
IE Business School – IE University

Antonios . Stamatogiannakis @ ie . edu

 

16
Nov
In a previous post (see here), I had introduced to you Health2Market; a 3-year long project funded by the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Commission, aiming to provide Health researchers with the necessary business knowledge and skills for more viable Intellectual Property Rights management as well as market exploitation of their results through setting up of new business ventures in health/life science sectors .
I was recently at the pilot academy of H2M, and the case of some researchers-entrepreneurs caught my attention. Why? In marketing, we expect a company to be profitable by meeting the needs of its customers… In some complicated business settings though, it is hard to identify who your customer is!!
I will try to describe what I mean as accurately as possible, given that I am not a doctor. The researchers have developed a specific type of “coating” that could be applied on artificial bone implants. This coating greatly reduced the probability that the implant would be rejected by the patient’s body after the surgery. So, it sounded like a great product! It could reduce the risks of further surgery for a patient, relieve their families from extra anxiety, reduce the operational costs of hospitals, free up some time for doctors, increase the profitability of private health insurance, increase the effectiveness of public health insurance, and so on. But who are the real customers here? A closer look shows that this is not an easy question to answer!
  • The patients? Well, sure they are the main beneficiaries… But in most cases they will be minimally involved in paying for the extra price of a coated implant. In addition, they will probably not be involved at all in the implant choice process. They will do whatever the doctors suggest, and the hospital has available.
  • The patients’ families? Likewise, the benefits for them are clear too. But their involvement in paying the costs and deciding will be very little.
  • The hospitals? Of course, the hospitals are the ones that will have to order the coated implants. But are they the customers? To start with, they are not paying – the patients and the insurance pay. In addition, there is a good chance that the person who makes the orders for the implants has little understanding of the coating advantages, and is mostly interested in keeping costs low, and existing suppliers happy. Finally, coated implants reduce the number of needed surgeries. So they are bad for the hospital’s business! Thus, in extreme and, perhaps, unethical cases, for-profit hospitals might actually oppose this innovation.
  • The doctors? They may have some role in deciding what implants to use. They see the benefits for their patients, and for themselves (less surgeries). But this role may be limited. In addition, they are not the ones who pay.
  • The implant manufacturers? They are the ones who will initially pay for the coating, and then sell the coated implants to the hospitals for higher prices. But there is NO WAY to convince them, unless the hospitals are convinced to try the coated implants.
  • The (public or private) insurance? They are paying for great part of the additional surgeries needed…but they do not decide on what implants will be used!

To conclude, even seemingly easy marketing questions – like who your customer is – are sometimes very tough to answer. In such cases, knowing your market and marketing your product to all interested parties (by “selling” different each benefits to each), can be key. This is the use of a proper “market analysis” – known to marketing core course students as “the 5 Cs” (company, customer, competition, collaborators, context)

By the way, if you are (or know someone who is) considering to start a health-research based business, stay tuned:

http://www.health2market.eu/

 

Antonios (Adoni) Stamatogiannakis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Marketing
IE Business School – IE University

Antonios . Stamatogiannakis @ ie . edu

2
Nov

“When a man’s knowledge is sufficient to attain, and his virtue is not sufficient to enable him to hold, whatever he may have gained, he will lose again.”

-          Confucius

Most marketers would be surprised to learn that an important objective they have was so concisely summarized by Confucius many centuries ago. Companies, just like individuals, must strive to attain and hold on their objects of desire. The only difference is that whereas individuals usually have a diverse set of objectives (for consumers’ pursuits to attain and maintain whatever is desirable for them, see my previous posts here, here, and here), companies frequently have only one: CUSTOMERS!

Customer loyalty has been an important focus for both managerial and academic research. Hundreds of reports have been published, dealing both with general loyalty-related issues (e.g., by McKinsey) as well as with loyalty in specific business sectors (e.g., by Bain, on retail banking). This “research frenzy” on loyalty is well justified, as there is little doubt that increased customer loyalty leads to increased profitability. A seminal paper (Reichheld & Sasser 1990; Harvard Business Review) identifies the sources for this increase in profitability. Specifically, loyal customers are usually less costly to have (compared to acquiring new ones), are more likely to buy other products and services from the company, are less price sensitive (allowing the company to charge price premiums), and finally are the best ambassadors for the brand, generating thus additional sales via referrals.    

Despite the great amount of work investigating customer loyalty over the last decades, the topic is still “hot”. Why? Well, first, because it is super-important. And, second, because we still need to understand it better.

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IE Business School has partnered with Travel-Club (the biggest multi-sponsor loyalty program in Spain, handling loyalty programs of companies such as Repsol and Eroski) to respond to this need for further investigation. They have created a “Loyalty Research Chair”, the purpose of which would be to combine the resources and expertise of Travel-Club with the research capabilities of IE Business School in order to answer questions like:

  • What are the benefits of a customer loyalty program for a company?
  • What are the benefits of a customer loyalty program for loyal customer?
  • How can these benefits be reliably measured?
  • What variations of a loyalty program maximize these benefits? Do they differ by business sector?

IE marketing department has compiled a team of excellent researchers (marketing professors Dilney Gonçalves, Shameek Sinha, and myself), leaded by the head of the marketing department, professor Teresa Serra, to carry this task

If customer loyalty is an interesting topic for you, stay tuned for the exciting outputs of this initiative!

Antonios (Adoni) Stamatogiannakis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Marketing
IE Business School – IE University

Antonios . Stamatogiannakis @ ie . edu

28
Sep

Health2Market: From health research to healthy business

Written on September 28, 2013 by Antonios Stamatogiannakis in B2B Marketing, Biopharma, Innovation

Great amounts of resources are spent every year on health research. These resources serve one greater purpose: to improve individuals’ well-being. Unfortunately, however, much of the output of this research just gets stockpiled into scientific journals, without exploiting its full practical potential. A question then is, how could health researchers be motivated to actually push their inventions into real healthcare products, that will eventually enhance the welfare of individuals?

Health2Market, for which I am the scientific coordinator for IE, is an initiative trying to provide a solution to this problem. Health2Market is a 3-year long project funded by the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Commission. It aims at providing Health researchers with the necessary business knowledge and skills for more viable Intellectual Property Rights management as well as market exploitation of their results through setting up of new business ventures in health/life science sectors .

It gives great flexibility to the interested health researches by offering (free of charge) services ranging from e-learning, to face to face training, even to personalized coaching for the most promising cases.  The goal is to motivate them in order to transform the great research that they are already conducting to healthy businesses.

To conclude, just like it is not enough to have a great product to succeed in the marketplace, it is not enough to do great health research to improve individuals’ well-being. This research must find its way to the individuals who will benefit from it. This is, fundamentally, a question of doing business, a lot more than doing research.  In this vein, initiatives such as Health2Market hit the sweet spot: They try to equip health researchers with the tools they need to bring their inventions to life, and (why not?) bring life with their inventions.

By the way, if you are (or know someone who is) considering to start a health-research based business, stay tuned:

http://www.health2market.eu/

 

Antonios (Adoni) Stamatogiannakis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Marketing
IE Business School – IE University

Antonios . Stamatogiannakis @ ie . edu

4
Feb

Oreo reinventa la Superbowl

Written on February 4, 2013 by Ignacio Gafo in ADVERTISING, Branding, E-MARKETING, International Marketing

¿Cuál ha sido el mejor anuncio de la Superbowl?

Siento adelantarme a mi amigo Jesús Rebollo, pero no puedo dejar de escribir sobre los anuncios que se lanzaron ayer y preguntaros cuál ha sido el mejor.

Seguro que al igual que yo, habréis recibido un buen número de correos y artículos, en el que distintos medios y personas dan su opinión. Que si cuál ha sido el más entretenido, el más ingenioso, el más notorio, el más pobre, etc.

De lo que había visto, claramente me quedaba con el de Audi. Me parecía ingenioso, tenía llegada al público objetivo y encima trasmitía muy bien los valores de marca…

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Algo que no ha conseguido este año Bud, que para mí ha sido una gran decepción. Porque aunque como dice el New York Times es ciertamente entrañable, creo que la imagen que transmiten es muy soft y muy alejada de lo que uno espera de esta marca…

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Como os decía, me quedaba con Audi, hasta que llegó a mis manos un artículo de Sandro Pozzi, en el que se explicaba la GENIALIDAD (con mayúsculas) de Oreo. Que, aprovechando un apagón de 34 minutos en la final, colgó en Twitter el anuncio que teneís debajo:

Como os podéis imaginar, se ha llevado una de las mejores valoraciones el día después, además un sinfin de RT (14,000 RT el primer minuto). Lo que no es para menos pues evidencia varias cosas:

  • La importancia del momento. Las marcas tienen que estar “vivas” y conectar a tiempo real con los consumidores.
  • La importancia del marketing digital. Del Social Media en particular, que puede llevar a impactos superiores a los que consiguen las marcas invirtiendo muchos muchos millones (8 millones de US$ de media en la Superbowl).
  • La importancia de la creatividad. Puede que cambien los formatos; puede que cambie el consumidor; pero la capacidad de crear e innovar siempre estará ahí.
  • La importancia de la simplicidad. Menos es ciertamente más.

 

Espero vuestros comentarios e impresiones en @ignacio gafo y en @ieweblog.

 

THINK DIFFERENT!!!

Ignacio Gafo

 

PS1: Alguno me dirá que el apagón estaba programado. Con todo lo que está ocurriendo hoy, ya me creo que cualquier cosa. Pero esto rozaría lo inconcebible.

PS2: Gracias a mis alumnos del GMBABL y en especial a Adolfo, por despertarme la gusanillo y provocar este post.

19
Jan

In this post, allow me to move away from consumer research and touch upon a Business to Business marketing issue.

An interesting on-line business model was recently brought to my attention: Shopify (www.shopify.com ; or www.shopify.com.mx if you speak Spanish). Shopify is an on-line service, which helps anyone interested create an online store – today. Their site includes a full description of their services (creating and running the store, accepting payments, moving to a mobile store, etc.). In addition, it features success cases of their service, their 3-level pricing scheme, as well as other useful information.

 

 

 

 

 

So, why is it different from other online stores? Well, that is exactly the point: IT IS NOT DIFFERENT! It is very similar to many on-line stores.  For instance, if you go to the website of El Corte Ingles (http://www.elcorteingles.es ) you will see more or less the same features for the products that it sells: a description of the product, a few illustrations of how it works, pricing info, upgraded versions of the product, etc.

And why is this similarity striking? Well, simply because Shopify targets business customers, and El Corte Ingles targets consumers… And any marketing professor (including myself) and any marketing textbook (like those I use for teaching) would tell you that these two targets are VERY different. For instance, one of the textbooks that I use (Marketing Management, Kotler and Keller, 14th global Edition, Pearson, 2012, pp. 206-207) says that some characteristics of B2B markets are:

  • Fewer and Larger Buyers. Well, Shopify targets apparently many and not so big clients. If your most expensive products brings you $ 179/ month, you have to have MANY clients.
  • Close supplier-customer relationship. Apparently, the closest many of Shopify’s customers have been to it is an extended email exchange…
  • Professional buyers: Obviously if a firm can barely afford $100 / month for their on-line shop, it cannot afford having a professional buyer.
  • Multiple sales calls: Hm… in this case it seems that the clients are calling shopify, after browsing their website.
  • Geographically concentrated customers: Shopify appeals to a global audience.

That, of course, does not necessarily mean that B2B Marketing is fundamentally consumer-izing (check the vid below to see how fundamentals always remain the same).

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My take, is that a new form of B2B markets is emerging: One in which the customers resemble closer the mass consumer markets. Such markets may be more important as small business (due to the economic crisis) try to expand their reach. Whether or not sustainable business is possible in these markets remains to be seen. Having that said, practitioners (as is frequently the case) have already sensed and are exploiting this trend, while academics are not yet discussing it – at least not in written form.

But then again, if everything was in textbooks, why would anyone need a Business School?

 

Antonios (Adoni) Stamatogiannakis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Marketing
IE Business School – IE University

antonios.stamatogiannakis@ie.edu

22
Oct

Recuerdo una conferencia del Presidente de Phillip Morris en España hará unos dos años. En la misma, hablando del mercado del tabaco, planteó algo que me pareció muy interesante: El mercado estaba cambiando radicalmente, y sólo las empresas que se posicionaran en un extremo (en este caso, superpremium o en precio) iban a sobrevivir; por lo que los que se quedaran en medio iban a quedar en tierra de nadie y desposicionados…

La verdad es que en numerosas ocasiones he podido comprobar cómo dicha afirmación se ha hecho realidad en numerosos sectores, con innumerables marcas desposicionadas en el camino…

Y el otro día, viendo la nueva campaña de Mc Donalds en televisión, no pude evitar recordar esta afirmación… Así, si entramos en la página web de Mc Donalds, amén de las inevitables promociones de venta y de precio, encontramos sorprendentemente este COMPROMISO DE 13 PUNTOS:

01.  Que el 75% DE NUESTRA COMPRA PROCEDA DE PROVEEDORES ESPAÑOLES.

02.  Que nuestra carne 100% VACUNO PROVENGA EN SU MAYORIA DE GANADERÍAS ESPAÑOLAS. Actualmente nos suministran más de 30.000.

03. Invertir en la apertura de más de 60 NUEVOS RESTAURANTES en los próximos 3 años con una INVERSIÓN CERCANA A 160 MILLONES DE EUROS.

04.  Incentivar la AGRICULTURA LOCAL, INCREMENTANDO la compra de fruta y verdura procedente principalmente de la HUERTA ESPAÑOLA.

05.  Seguir aplicando voluntariamente CERTIFICACIONES EXTERNAS como la Q de Calidad, que avalen la gestión de calidad que ofrecemos en nuestros restaurantes.

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06. Generar 3.000 NUEVOS PUESTOS DE TRABAJO en 3 años que se sumarán a los más de 22.000 EMPLEOS ACTUALES.

07. Fomentar la ESTABILIDAD EN EL EMPLEO, mediante el mantenimiento de un 90% de nuestra contratación INDEFINIDA en las plantillas de nuestros RESTAURANTES.

08. Desarrollar profesionalmente a NUESTROS EMPLEADOS, para facilitar su PROMOCIÓN LABORAL. EL 100% de la GERENCIA de nuestros restaurantes procede de PROMOCIÓN INTERNA.

09. Apostar por la CONCILIACIÓN LABORAL Y PERSONAL y la IGUALDAD DE OPORTUNIDADES PARA TODOS NUESTROS EMPLEADOS, que nos ha sido reconocida por el certificado de Empresa Familiarmente Responsable (EFR ®).

10. Ayudar y acoger a FAMILIAS CON NIÑOS ENFERMOS construyendo dos nuevas CASAS RONALD McDONALD en España que se sumarán a las ya existentes en BARCELONA Y MÁLAGA, lo que permitirá cubrir la demanda de unas 1.000 familias anualmente.

11. Seguir apoyando a la FUNDACIÓN INFANTIL RONALD McDONALD® con una aportación mínima anual de 1 MILLÓN DE EUROS para contribuir al bienestar de los niños y sus familias.

12. Comunicar y continuar trabajando en el PERFIL NUTRICIONAL DE NUESTROS PRODUCTOS, teniendo como objetivo REDUCIR SAL, GRASAS Y AZÚCARES.

13. Fomentar el CONSUMO DE FRUTAS Y VERDURAS, a través de nuestras CAMPAÑAS DE TELEVISIÓN dirigidas a niños.

Un enfoque arriesgado pero inteligente, con el que tratan de quitarse la imagen de “comida chatarra”  y demás apelativos con los que normalmente se asocia a la cadena americana. Vamos, campaña de Branding con efectos a medio – largo plazo, en medio de una crisis sin paliativos y enfoques a corto…

Enfoque que, como os imagináis, contrasta al 100% con el de BURGER KING que, ante tal declaración de intenciones lo tiene claro: Carne, carne y más carne . Que si Whopper triple, que si Whopper en todas las varidades , que si Menú Burger King XXL, …Back to basics en toda regla (back to carne en este caso), aprovechando el devaneo de la competencia…

Dicho lo cual, you make your choice:  “EL SABOR DEL KING” de Burger King o “COMPARTIMOS MAS DE LO QUE IMAGINAS” DE Mc Donalds. ¡Lo que quieras!, pero en un extremo…

 

¿Y el resto? No lo sé la verdad. Hace ya tiempo que no sabemos de Wendys y semejantes…

 

Espero vuestros comentarios en @ieweblog o en @ignaciogafo.

 

THINK DIFFERENT!!!

 

Ignacio Gafo

16
Sep

I-PHONE 5: EVOLUTION OR REGRESSION?

Written on September 16, 2012 by Ignacio Gafo in Branding, Innovation, International Marketing

The I-Phone 5 was just launched some days ago, and this time I decided hold on to my thoughts and start analyzing the market reaction. Interestingly, when reading the opinion of different specialized media, all experts seem to agree with the headlines from The Guardian: “Apple’s iPhone 5 is brilliant – but not best in class“.

This is indeed a very interesting statement, considering that objectively speaking, the new model incorporates a big deal of new functionalities and improvements:

 

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Among others: Improved phone design (larger screen, thinnier, less weight), better performance (much better processor), functionalities (such as new software for pictures)  and updated operating system (new one incorporated).

SO WHAT IS GOING ON HERE?

Is it that the product was not properly introduced by Tim Cook?

Is it that competition has performed better than Apple and now you need a real breakthrough to make the difference?

Is it that they have mismanaged the communication and have filtered in advance too many features?

Is it that we are suffering the Jobs´syndrome and still need some evidence from Tim Cook that he can reivent the phone again?

Or is it simply that the expectations with Apple are so high that is almost impossible to be up to them?

 HOW DID THE STOCKMARKET REACT?

Not sure what were the reasons behind, but upon considering them, one would expect the stockmarket to drop Apple stockprice significanty, as long as they have been unable to meet expections…

But guess what has happened? Shares of Apple (AAPL) topped their day-old all-time high, hitting $696.82 Friday amid strong enthusiasm for the iPhone 5.

Ongoing speculation with Apple?

Different vision of investors versus specialized media (and techies)?

Not sure again about  the responses, but we certainly seem to have a mismatch between experts and investors..

 

HOW WILL THE I-PHONE PERFORM IN THE MID AND LONG TERM?

In my view, it will keep on leading worldwide sales within the smartphone segment and will keep on building brand loyalty for Apple, at least for the rest of this year.

What will come then is unclear to me. I am with The Guardian that the product is not a breakthrough but, if we ask the core Apple customers what they think, we might find out surprising responses that justify the stockmarket boost… Who knows, maybe non-product features are are more relevant than those specialists thought…

 

I look forward for your views and comments @ieweblog and @ignaciogafo.

 

THINK DIFFERENT!!!

Ignacio Gafo

 

3
May

El valor de la simplicidad

Written on May 3, 2012 by Jesús Rebollo in Branding, E-MARKETING, Innovation

Vuelta a los orígenes. A la sencillez. A saber qué hacemos y por qué lo hacemos. Entender las auténticas necesidades y anhelos de nuestros consumidores y estar atentos a escuchar lo que nos dicen.

Desde hace unos días estoy leyendo la biografía de S. Jobs. Seguro que muchos de vosotros ya lo habréis hecho pero hay 3 elementos que me están resultado impactantes:

1.- La obsesión por el detalle como un elemento clave en el desarrollo de la experiencia del cliente con la marca en donde la estética no cumple una función formal sino esencial en la creación de la marca

2.- Priorizar la máxima sencillez. En cada etapa del proceso de contacto con el cliente.  Si algo es ornamental o sobra, hay que eliminarlo. Si aporta un valor, se potencia.

3.- Este espíritu debe imperar en toda la organización y en todos los productos. El mejor ejemplo de ello es cuando quitaron la pantalla de los iPod Shuffle. O cuando apreciamos el diseño de sus tiendas con su famosa “Genius Bar”

Al hilo con el concepto de la sencillez, este mes HBR acaba de publicar un artículo titulado “To keep your costumers, keep it simple” (Patrick Spenner & Karen Freema; HBR Mayo 2012) en donde presentan un estudio muy interesante que refleja cómo muchas veces las marcas pretendemos saber qué quiere el consumidor sin realmente entender las razones de sus necesidades.

En este sentido destacan el caso de la percepción que tenemos de los clientes y su experiencia en la web. Las marcas piensan una de las razones básicas para entrar en su web es para buscar información o para “sentirse conectado” cuando la realidad es que el consumidor está interesado, mayoritariamente, por buscar descuentos, comprar productos y por saber más de los productos. El concepto de “sentirse conectado” es realmente secundario.

Este podría ser un claro ejemplo de lo que Lewitt llamó Marketing Myopia. Al tomar nuestras decisiones en función de lo que creemos que nuestros consumidores quieren, acabamos generando frustración en ellos y abandonan nuestra marca.

En uno de los libros más interesantes sobre retailing (Inside the mind of the shopper – H. Sorensen) ya comentaba que en un experimento realizado en Wall-Mart habían detectado que cuando un cliente entra en una tienda y encuentra lo que está buscando en menos de 1 minuto, su estancia y su gasto en la tienda aumenta en relación con otros puntos de venta en los que el consumidor tiene que buscar lo que desea. Y la base de este concepto es nuevamente la sencillez y la claridad.

Todos hemos tenido la desastrosa experiencia de ir a una tienda y buscar durante varios minutos sin que nada ni nadie nos ayude a encontrar lo que buscamos. En ese momento nos agobiamos, nos enfadamos y salimos corriendo de la tienda. Hoy, gracias a la capacidad que tenemos de saber exactamente qué busca un cliente, está en nuestra mano facilitar y reducir “el ruido” que genera en nuestros consumidores la incertidumbre de saber si encontrará lo que desea.

Podría ser peor. Y para eso os dejo este video…

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¿Qué pensáis vosotros? ¿Cómo reducís la incertidumbre de vuestro cliente?

Espero vuestros comentarios en el blog y os invito a seguirme en @jesusrebollog

Feliz jueves!

Jesús Rebollo

PD. BIENVENIDA CLAIRE

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